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Reel Review


Living up to the legacy? Shimano’s Curado G

 

Date: 2/12/12
Tackle Type: Reels
Manufacturer: Shimano
Reviewer: Zander






Total Score: 7.91 - GOOD

Introduction: The Curado Series has been a staple among anglers for many generations and has built up quite a following, perhaps even a “legacy.” Any change in a series as popular as this one is going to receive somewhat of a mixed reaction but the move to the Curado G has been met with debate since the reel’s initial unveiling at ICAST 2011. It’s time to see just how this latest version stacks up to the previous version and the competition.

 

Shimano Curado 200G5 Specifications

Line Capacity (lb/yds) 10/155, 14/110
Gear Ratio 5.0:1
Line retrieve per crank 21 inches
Weight 7.2oz.
Bearings 4BB, 1RB
Additional Features Reduced mass hub, HEG gearing, Super Free, super stopper, 1/8 turn easy access sideplate, Septon PV grips, dartanium drag, clicking drag adjustment, Super Stopper, metal cast control knob, anodized spool and handle
Origin Malaysia
MSRP $159.99

 


Shimano's new Curado G features a darker yet instantly recognizable green finish

Impressions: When the Curado D was first introduced anglers praised the reel’s updated design and ergonomics as well as the more robust feature-set. Time would confirm that the Curado D was one of the most well built reels of the time, and even today it continues to be a common sight on the decks of many bass boats. When the subsequent Curado E was released it marked a major departure from the previous reel and featured a brand new form factor as well as the use of graphite on both sideplates. The use of graphite in place of aluminum on the handle side sideplate was immediately met with apprehension from many anglers, included ourselves.


Three generations of Curado reels

First there is the question of “why.” While it is arguable that the use of graphite helped reduce the overall weight of the new reels the bottom line probably has more to do with sheer build of material (BOM) costs. The price of aluminum had risen over time and in order to keep the price low enough for the segment, factoring in inflation of course, it was likely the decision was based just as much on economics as it was on design.


The Curado G (right) features a slightly longer more pointed form factor...

While skeptical at first, the original Curado E 200 series proved to be a winner as well. Not only was the reel rigid enough to provide solid cranking power it was exceptional ergonomically speaking and Shimano followed it up with the even smaller Curado 50 size featuring the same form factor as the Core 50. There was little to no negative chatter about the introduction of the aluminum version of the Core 50, most anglers viewed this as an upgrade to the Curado Series, just one more choice in the “mean green machine” lineup.


...which is identical to the Caenan, yet looks smaller simply due to the darker color

Before we get into the new Curado G we also need to take a look at the Chronarch D Series which was also basically an aluminum version of the larger Core Series. The Chronarch D Series was a major upgrade from the distinctive yet much too heavy Chronarch B, both in form factor and functionality. But at this point the lines between the different series reels was really beginning to blur, and this factored in with the fact that these made in Japan reels were extremely expensive to manufacture must have played into the decision to revamp, or reset, both lineups.


Time to take a closer look

All this brings us to ICAST 2011 when the Curado G and Citica G debuted with the same form factor as the Caenan and the Chronarch E series replaced the “D” series with the same exact form factor as the previous Curado E Series, just with a sporty white and dark grey finish. Confused? So were many anglers that were unsure just what to think about the shift.


The drag star is no longer made out of aluminum

Next Section: A shift for the Curado and Chronarch


 

 

 

 

 

 
 





 

 



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