HOME | TACKLETOUR FORUMS  | EDITOR'S CHOICE | REVIEW ARCHIVE | ABOUT US | 

Latest ArticlesReels | Rods | Lines | Lures | Terminal Tackle | Tools | Storage | Watercraft | Apparel | Enthusiast | Interviews | Events | Maintenance | Autopsy

Hot Articles


ICAST 2019 Update Coverage
---------------

One for the Enthusiasts: The Shimnao Antares A70 Baitcaster with MGIII

 ---------------

Small but Mighty, the Megabass Dark Sleeper Swimbait
---------------
SOLID! The Shimano Bantam MGL Baitcaster
---------------

Selecting the right Rod, Reel, and Line for Your Walking Bait Arsenal
 


 


Reel Review

 

Abu Garcia Begins the Countdown to Liftoff with the 10.1:1 Revo4 Rocket (continued)

 

Centrifugal brakes, most commonly feature a set of very small counterweights that when extended, increase the rotational weight of the spool, causing it to slow down. More sophisticated designs allow these weights to extend when the spool is spinning the fastest, and retract as the spool is slowing down. Picture a figure skater spinning in a circle, with arms extended and note how their rate of spin increases as they pull their arms in - same basic physics.


But as part of Abu's Infini braking system, the Rocket also has magnetic brakes

Abu Garcia's Infini system features spring loaded centrifugal brakes, so in theory, the magnetic brakes are there to offer consistent control throughout the cast - but especially at the start and stop of your cast. While the centrifugal brakes take over in the middle of the cast when the spool is spinning the fastest, all in an effort to mitigate the occurrence of that inevitable professional overrun. Seriously, I can backlash any reel - I'm a professional.


The magnetic brakes are adjustable via this dial on the non-handle sideplate

If you take advantage of what is offered, the Infini braking system works very well, but with more control comes less distance. My preference is for a bit more simplicity with either a full magnet or centrifugal system. I was thrilled when Abu Garcia upgraded the $199 STX with their IVCB6L brakes and fully expected the $299 Rocket to have the same. Instead, it still has its Gen 3 braking system, so the only thing new left to test really was the retrieve and drag.


10.1:1 retrieve ratio? Really?

Retrieve: So just how fast is a 10.1:1 reel anyway? Given the spool's diameter, we calculate the rate of retrieve to be anywhere from nineteen to forty inches depending on how much line you have out on your cast. Of course, forty inches is taking into account the outer diameter of the spool, so you're never really going to get forty inches of retrieve on the turn of the handle unless you overfill your spool. Similarly, the nineteen inches per turn of the handle is assuming all your line is out on the cast.


Just how fast is too fast?

So if we take the conservative route and assume an average of the two, we get twenty nine inches per turn of the handle. Sound pretty good? Do any of these numbers honestly mean anything to you? What if we assume, when you're burning a reel, you can turn the handle consistently at about four or five turns per second? Remember the saying, if a bass wants it, you can't pull it back too fast? How fast is too fast? What if we took that rate of retrieve and converted it to miles per hour? Would that make it easier to relate? We think so. How fast do you think your retrieve would be in that terminology?


That equates to an average rate of retrieve of 29" per turn of the handle

We've put together a table to help demonstrate the speed of your retrieve, but let's work through one right here. Let's take the Revo4 Rocket's outer spool diameter measured at 32 millimeters. For simplicity's sake, we're just going to work with the full spool number, so at 10.1 revolutions of the spool per turn of the handle, this equates to the afore mentioned 40 inches per turn of the handle.


If you can spin the handle 5 revolutions per second, that's upwards of 8.3mph on a half empty spool!

I had Zander time me five times and the best I could do was roughly 5 turns of the handle per second. That equates to 200 inches of line per second. There are 3,600 seconds in an hour, and 63,360 inches in a mile, so working through the math, this comes to 11.4 miles per hour.


By comparison, typical trolling speed for trout is 1.5 - 3mph

Does that sound fast? Well, typical walking speed for a human being is roughly 3mph. Jogging is more like 6mph and a sprint is in the neighborhood of 15mph. In fishing terms, anglers trolling for Marlin typically do so at roughly 10mph depending on the bait. Salmon anglers troll at roughly two to two and a half miles per hour. Trout anglers troll at roughly 1.5 to 3mph. So at full speed, 11.4 mph in the water is pretty darn fast for a lure. But again, that's at full spool. If we use the average between an empty spool and a full spool, and assume that 5 revolutions per second rate, you're burning a lure with the Revo4 Rocket at about 8.3mph.


Baitcaster Speed of Retrieve Table
(assuming 15mm inside 32mm outside spool diameter)
 
Gear Ratio
Inches per Turn
Speed @ 4 Revolutions per Second (mph)
Speed @ 5 Revolutions per Second (mph)
Speed @ 6 Revolutions per Second (mph)
Avg
Range
Avg
Range
Avg
Range
Avg
Range
5.4
16
10-21
3.6

2.3-4.9

4.5
2.8-6.1
5.4
3.4-7.3
6.6
19
12-26
4.4

2.8-5.9

5.5
3.5-7.4
6.5
4.2-8.9
7.3
21
14-29
4.8

3.1-6.6

6.0
3.9-8.2
7.2
4.6-9.9
8.5
25
16-34
5.6

3.6-7.7

7.0
4.5-9.6
8.4
5.4-11.5
9
26
17-36
6.0

3.8-8.1

7.4
4.7-10.1
8.9
5.7-12.2
10.1
29
19-40
6.7

4.3-9.1

8.3
9.1-13.6
10
6.4-13.6

Next Section: Speed and Power?

 

 

   

Google
  Web
  TackleTour

 

 

 
 





 

 



Copyright 2000-2019 TackleTour LLC All rights reserved.
Privacy Policy information