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First look inside the new Curado I baitcaster
 


 

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Reel Review


Bigger and better, the Shimano Citica D edges into previous generation Curado territory
 

Date: 5/18/06
Tackle type: Reels
Manufacturer: Shimano
Reviewer: Zander






Total Score: 8.66

Introduction:
The Citica series as we knew it has been a mainstay reel for many anglers for a little over a decade, and had earned a reputation for being a solid reel that represented a very reel when it came to bang for the buck. The new Citica D follows the redesign of the Curado D, and both series have essentially moved up the ladder in terms of product positioning. So are anglers getting more reel for the money when they buy the new Citica? We aim to find out.
 

Shimano Citica D (CI200D) Specifications

Line Capacity (lb/yds) 8/180, 10/155, 14/110
Gear Ratio 6.2:1 (DPV reel feature 5:1 ratio)
Line Retrieve per crank (in) 25"
Weight 9.9 oz.
Bearings 4BB + 1RB
Additional Features Lo-Mass Spool, High Efficiency Gearing, Dartanium drag, Septon handle grips, Super Free, Super Stopper + Assist Stopper, recessed reel foot, VBS, aluminum frame, 1/4 turn easy access sideplate
Origin Made in Malaysia
MSRP $119.99


Impressions: 
When we broke the story at ICAST that there was a new Curado on the way we were immediately inundated with emails asking for release dates and more information. Some of you were thrilled and others of you griped at the direction the company was taking towards the Japanese Shimano Scorpion-like design. Nonetheless, the outpouring of feedback was unparalleled. Never before had we received so many requests, and over the course of our long term test we have received countless additional emails and posts on the forum inquiring as to the status of the review. So the wait is over, now let’s get into it…

 

The bigger badder Shimano Citica D

When the Citica was introduced Shimano released the following statement: “While we’ve always provided quality features and proven performance, these new Citica D series are a huge step up in baitcasting reels,” said Sweet. “The list of new features - HEG, Lo-Mass drilled spool, Super Free – will give diehard anglers even more enjoyment while on the water.”

The Citica gets a big bearing jump from 2 to 5

Indeed the list of new features in the Citica is impressive. When we first had a chance to hold one of these reels in our hands we remarked how large the new reels were. The main reason for the size increase is that Shimano decided to pack their “High Efficiency Gearing” in each and every Citica….no you won’t find a 100 size reel in this series. The next thing we noticed was the obvious base material upgrade in the new reel, no more economical black plastic anywhere. In terms of finish the reel reminded me of the old Chronarch 100A, and that’s a compliment.

Paired with a Kistler crankbait composite rod for some serious casting action


The reels are available in both left and right hand retrieve and with a brisk 6.2:1 ratio or more powerful 5.0:1 ratio (right hand only). Both the right and left reels are mirror images of one another. I should have reviewed this reel before the Curado 100D, as I now found myself in a somewhat challenging position. My expectations had certainly been set higher by my positive encounter with the new Curado, and here before me was the reel that to many was essentially the “new Curado” when considering pricing and positioning. Nonetheless I focused on the task at hand and paired the reel with a Kistler Crankbait composite and head out to the nearest body of water.

 

No more plastic, the dragstar is now aluminum

 

Real World Test: To test the Citica D  made a beeline to the Delta and focused my attention on largemouth bass. I also decided to try ripping up some fish at the San Luis Reservoir and O’Neil Forebay. Test lures included a variety of deep diving cranks, spinnerbaits, and my personal favorite…..jerkbaits.

 

Complete Rig for Shimano Citica D (CI200D) Field Tests

Rod(s) Kistler KCBCM7
Reel Shimano Citica 200D
Line(s) 12lb. Yozuri Hybrid

 

Solid metal construction all around

 

Casting: When it comes to casting the first thing to look at is the spool design. The Citica makes use of Shimano’s Lo-Mass spool which is essentially an oversized ported design. By cross drilling the spool weight is reduced making the main mass of the spool closer to the shaft. “Much like a lightweight bicycle wheel where most of the mass lies in the tire, the majority of the Lo-Mass spool lies in the arbor and line it is spooled with, “explains Jeremy Sweet with Shimano’s product development staff. “This enables us to provide anglers low start-up inertia for manageable casts, plus we could sacrifice line capacity and still provide a reel that can make long casts.”

 

The Citica D has one of the largest openings for spool access we have ever seen

 

We put Jeremy’s statement to the test in our initial casting rounds and found the Citica to be a very fine caster. The reel makes use of Shimano’s reliable VBS brake system and backlashes are easy to avoid even when flailing baits. With the weights set to 2 we were able to achieve 90 feet pretty easily with our 1/2oz casting plug. With it set to zero we did slightly better but the gains were minimal simply because we found ourselves thumbing the spool over-aggressively in an effort to maintain control


Next Section: Keep on casting...


 

 

 

 

 

 
 





 

 



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