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Lure Review

 


BullShad Swimbaits Extends Their Lineup : The BullGill

 

Date: 8/19/17
Tackle Type: Lure
Manufacturer: BullShad Swimbaits
Reviewer: Cal






Total Score: 8.17 - GREAT

Introduction:
It's been over seven years since our last review of a product by BullShad Swimbaits - Triton Mike Bucca's bait company. It's hard to believe it's been that long since we've reviewed one of his products, but then again, we weren't really aware there was more to BullShad Swimbaits than the original product up until about a year ago. What a huge oversight on our part! With everything from a new rat to herring to a wake bait and more, we have a lot of catching up to do with BullShad Swimbaits and today we start that journey with a look at a bait that takes the company's namesake and changes it up oh so naturally. Here's out look at BullShad Swimbat's BullGill.

 

BullShad Swimbait's BullGill Specifications

Type Slow Sink
Length 5, 6, 7 inch
Weight 1.5 - 2.5 ounces
Depth Any
Material Resin
Colors 2 (blue gill & dirty bone)
Hooks Mustad KVD Hooks
MSRP $57.99

 


The BullShad comes in three sizes. Shown here are the 5" (bottom) and the 6" (top).

 

Impressions: Most bait manufacturers, and swimbait makers especially, have a signature look to their baits. This usually involves some distinctive features around the bait's head and eyes. For BullShad Swimbaits, the signature feature is the entire bait from the fibrous tail to the bait's scale texture to the open joint design to the head, eyes, and most of all, to the overall rough finish on the baits.

 


From the bare bones detail at the head...

 

It is this distressed look of BullShad's product that I find so endearing. While most all other manufacturers are producing baits with perfect or near perfect paint schemes, BullShad makes baits that look like they've been fished for a year or two right out of the package. It's like fishing with an injured baitfish!

 


... to that rough scale pattern and fiber tail, BullShad swimbaits have a signature look and feel.

 

The BullGill, like all other BullShad products is a four piece bait with three open joints. The afore mentioned scale pattern is even more rough on this bait than the original BullShad and the fibrous tail is wider in span, but shorter in length. While the bait is taller in profile that the shad, its overall shape is more stretched out than other typical panfish style baits.

 


Ready for action on board a Megabass of America Destroyer Onager and Daiwa Ryoga Shrapnel spooled with 20lb Sunline Supernatural.

Real World Tests: Silly me, I've actually been fishing the BullGill for a couple of years before ever realizing it was actually a different bait than the BullShad. I mean, I knew it was different from the shape, but I did not realize it was a separate product line with a set number of sizes, etc. until the Spring of 2017. Once I made that realization, I began fishing it with more earnestly en-route to this review. My typical setup is any rod that can handle a roughly two ounce bait and anywhere from fourteen to twenty pound test nylon monofilament. I will actually use fluorocarbon too no occasion.


The range of motion in the bait's four pieces is pretty good.

Castability: As mentioned earlier, the BullGill is a four-piece bait. Sometimes, multi-piece baits can be a little unwieldy through the air, but the BullGill demonstrates none of this squirrelly-ness. I fished both the five and six inch sizes, and my favorite by far is the five inch. The size difference is not that apparent side by side but for some reason, that slightly more compact size strikes an accord with me during a cast and also during the retrieve.


This bass came up out of a submerged weedbed to crush the six inch BullGill.

Next Section: Dive, Dive, Dive!

 

 

 

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